B. Easy yet B.Ware

"I'm not a businessman...I'm a business, man!"

3,736 notes

midori-fairy:

idriselbow:

pussyharvest:

theraceproblem:

This is the news story this girl is referring to: Vietnamese Nail salon’s racist Twitter tirade offends customers
Sharing this as an FYI to my Black followers on what the Vietnamese phrase “mi deng” means.

yoooooo missouri city, texas is like mad close to my home so yeah fuck evyerhing

Viet here.
Anti-black racism is pervasive as fuck in american vietnamese communities and back home in vietnam. This is coming from my own experiences within my homes, communities, and schools.
We have derogatory language for many other races. White ppl, latin@s, etc. But often, only those perceived as black or latin@ will be spoken of negatively. 
Vietnamese children are taught to fear other poc. If a child is behaving badly in public and a poc is nearby we’d tell them that the “mi deng” will get them. As a child, I remember having to lie about a friend’s race if I wanted to go to their house. My Latin@ (I lived and continue to live in a large spanish speaking community) friends would become white or vietnamese girls.
The older generation carried much of their racism to america when they immigrated because of the war. In vietnam there are stereotypical blackface comedy skits that are still happening. And the younger generation of vietnamese americans absorbed this and the added systemic racism still evident in american culture. I continue to hear young vietnamese americans using racist coded language when they don’t want another poc to realize they’re speaking of them.
I’m writing all this to other fellow viets. If you see or hear your viet family members or friends saying or doing racist things call them out on it. Tell them that whatever they did or said was racist. My mother did not understand the harm she was doing until I explained it to her. This is a cultural and linguistic barrier that we need to overcome to ensure newer generations of viets don’t absorb that kind of racist bullshit.

Reblogged for commentary. Thank you for putting it eloquently.

midori-fairy:

idriselbow:

pussyharvest:

theraceproblem:

This is the news story this girl is referring to: Vietnamese Nail salon’s racist Twitter tirade offends customers

Sharing this as an FYI to my Black followers on what the Vietnamese phrase “mi deng” means.

yoooooo missouri city, texas is like mad close to my home so yeah fuck evyerhing

Viet here.

Anti-black racism is pervasive as fuck in american vietnamese communities and back home in vietnam. This is coming from my own experiences within my homes, communities, and schools.

We have derogatory language for many other races. White ppl, latin@s, etc. But often, only those perceived as black or latin@ will be spoken of negatively. 

Vietnamese children are taught to fear other poc. If a child is behaving badly in public and a poc is nearby we’d tell them that the “mi deng” will get them. As a child, I remember having to lie about a friend’s race if I wanted to go to their house. My Latin@ (I lived and continue to live in a large spanish speaking community) friends would become white or vietnamese girls.

The older generation carried much of their racism to america when they immigrated because of the war. In vietnam there are stereotypical blackface comedy skits that are still happening. And the younger generation of vietnamese americans absorbed this and the added systemic racism still evident in american culture. I continue to hear young vietnamese americans using racist coded language when they don’t want another poc to realize they’re speaking of them.

I’m writing all this to other fellow viets. If you see or hear your viet family members or friends saying or doing racist things call them out on it. Tell them that whatever they did or said was racist. My mother did not understand the harm she was doing until I explained it to her. This is a cultural and linguistic barrier that we need to overcome to ensure newer generations of viets don’t absorb that kind of racist bullshit.

Reblogged for commentary. Thank you for putting it eloquently.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

4 notes

If you are behind on your rent in Arkansas, then your landlord can go to court and get a warrant issued for your arrest. This is part of an ongoing trend intended to criminalize being poor in America, thus strengthening the poverty trap. Alternet recently reported on an incident where a couple one month behind on rent were dragged from their home by police officers:
One evening this past August, Angela and Steve received a knock on the door. The couple opened it to see two police officers standing outside.
“One of them said, ‘We have a warrant for y’all’s arrest. … The next thing I remember is my husband dragging me from the kitchen. I had fainted,” Angela recalled, according to Human Rights Watch.
Their crime? The couple was unable to afford their $585 rent payment that month.
And this is not an isolated incident. In July of this past year, the New York Times reported about people who were being locked up for minor probation offenses if they could not afford to pay the fee, and how private probation companies were making millions off this arrangement. One woman mentioned in the Times story, Ms. Ray, had been locked up for 40 days and had accrued $3, 170 in fees, all assessed by a private probation company. Ms. Ray’s offense was driving without a license. Also, Salon recently followed up with another report on how people who cannot pay fines for minor traffic violations are being jailed. Immigrants have always wanted to come to America because climbing out of poverty, although never a certainly, has always been a possibility in this country. But now, with school pipelines to prison and imprisonment as punishment for minor infractions, such as traffic violations and late rent payments, lawmakers and administrators are designing a system which ensures that fewer people are able to escape the poverty trap. If this weren’t all happening at once, I’d call it a coincidence, but this isn’t happenstance. Can’t be. This is a concerted effort to stymie the upward flow of the American Horde. More and more, America’s class designations and arrangements are being made to look like that of a third world country. I don’t know what that means for the future, not exactly, but I think it’s safe to say that this grand American Experiment is officially over.